WHAT'S AN EXAMPLE OF AN OPEN-PIT MINE THAT OPERATED AND CLOSED SUCCESSFULLY?

STEPHENSON, Mich. Feb. 17, 2018 – We often get asked for an example of a metallic mine that operated and closed successfully. One such example is the Flambeau Mine, located about 1.5 miles south of the City of Ladysmith in Rusk County, Wisconsin. Below you'll find photos of Flambeau both during and after operations.

Flambeau was an open-pit mine that produced copper with trace amounts of gold between 1993 and 1997. After mining ceased the pit was backfilled and the land was returned to its original contour. Today the site is home to ample wildlife, hundreds of species of plants, and year-round recreation opportunities. The nearby Flambeau River remains protected to this day.

 

Source: http://flambeaumine.com

 

 

 

 


MINING INDUSTRY SET FOR COMEBACK IN WISCONSIN

GREEN BAY, WI. Feb. 11, 2018 - Modern mining is very different from mining in the past. Today's mining is driven largely by technology and guided by regulations devoted to protecting the environment.

Virtually everything in our lives (food, education, entertainment, communication, clean energy, healthcare) is dependent on mining in some way. Basically, have a look at anything around you and apply the following simple rubric: “If it wasn’t grown, it was mined".

 

Source: NBC26 Green Bay


WE'RE HIRING FOR AN EXECUTIVE ASSISTANT

STEPHENSON, Mich. Feb. 8, 2018 – Aquila Resources is hiring for an executive assistant at the Back Forty Mine in Stephenson, MI. A complete role description can be found here. The deadline to apply for this position is February 23, 2018.

 


AQUILA RESOURCES UPDATES MINERAL RESOURCE ESTIMATE AT BACK FORTY DEPOSIT

TORONTOFeb. 7, 2018 /CNW/ - Aquila Resources Inc. (TSX: AQA) ("Aquila" or the "Company") announced today an updated Mineral Resource Estimate for its wholly owned Back Forty Gold-Zinc deposit in Michigan, USA (the "2018 Mineral Resource Estimate"). The 2018 Mineral Resource Estimate was completed by P&E Mining Consultants Inc. of Brampton, Ontario ("P&E").

The 2018 Mineral Resource Estimate replaces the Mineral Resource Estimate that was first disclosed in an Aquila news release dated February 3, 2013 (the "2013 Mineral Resource Estimate") and subsequently included in a Technical Report completed by Tetra Tech Inc. with an effective date of July 23, 2014, which is available under Aquila's SEDAR profile at www.sedar.com.

Read the full release on Aquila Resources' website.


WOULD FLOODING OF THE MENOMINEE RIVER IMPACT THE MINE?

STEPHENSON, Mich. Jan. 29, 2018 – Flooding will not impact the Back Forty Mine. The mine is located on a small bluff above the Menominee River, outside of the 100-year floodplain. A 100-year flood is an event that has the probability of occurring once in 100 years. If such an event were to happen, studies suggest the river would reach roughly 10 feet below the top of the bluff. Also, if we experience an extreme storm event, an emergency spillway will channel water from site to the contact water basins and the open pit. The basins alone can hold 161 million gallons of water.

Since water takes the path of least resistance, it would likely spread out into Wisconsin and downriver. The MDEQ has provided a FAQ regarding the Menominee River Floodplain and the Back Forty Mine. You can access the entire FAQ on the MDEQ website.

MDEQ Floodplain Map
Source: http://www.michigan.gov/documents/deq/wrd-back-forty-floodplain-faq_611575_7.pdf

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

If you have a topic for our blog, please email your idea to info@backfortymine.wp2.adnetcms.com.

 


OFFICIAL STATEMENT REGARDING WETLAND PERMIT APPLICATION

STEPHENSON, Mich. Jan. 23, 2017 – Aquila Resources appreciates the community’s interest and feedback on our permitting efforts, as well as the hard work undertaken by our team on the wetland application. We’re confident the application minimizes total wetland impact and protects the environment.

It’s important to note that the United States Environmental Protection Agency (“EPA”) has delegated permitting authority to the Michigan Department of Environmental Quality (“MDEQ”). Michigan has maintained this designation by administering laws and regulations that remain consistent with the Clean Water Act (CWA). The state has been conducting a thorough review of the wetland permit application for more than two years, during which time the EPA has been involved and providing input. We look forward to regulatory approval of the application during the first half of 2018. This is the fourth and final permit required to build and operate the Back Forty Mine.


WHO PAYS FOR RECLAMATION OF THE BACK FORTY MINE?

STEPHENSON, Mich. Jan. 8, 2018 –Aquila Resources will carry out and pay for all reclamation activities during operations and following mine closure as required by law. As a protective measure for the community, if for some unforeseen reason this cannot happen, the State of Michigan requires mining companies to provide adequate financial assurance.

We are committed and obligated by law to ensure that the costs of reclamation do not fall on the local community or taxpayers. Aquila is required to secure a bond based on the assessed value to have the mine closed and reclaimed by a third party. Every three years, financial assurance will be reviewed to account for any changes in the total reclamation cost. The State of Michigan has full control of the bond until Aquila completes their fiduciary duty.

If you have a question, please email info@backfortymine.wp2.adnetcms.com.


QUESTIONS AND ANSWERS ABOUT MICHIGAN, WISCONSIN AND MINNESOTA

STEPHENSON, Mich. Dec. 19, 2017 – This week we came across three questions that we felt needed clarification. The questions span Michigan, Wisconsin and Minnesota.

1. Does the Michigan Department of Environmental Quality (“MDEQ”) have the authority to make wetlands permit decisions?

Yes. The EPA approved Michigan’s request for delegation of federal wetlands permits in the early 1980s. To maintain this authority, Michigan’s laws and regulations must remain consistent with the Clean Water Act (CWA). Even though MDEQ has this authority, they will gather input from various regulatory agencies, including from the EPA, regarding Aquila's wetland permit application for the Back Forty Mine.

2. Did Aquila Resources open offices in Wisconsin? 

No. The company may conduct exploration actives in Marathon and Taylor counties in late 2018. Prior to any activity taking place, Aquila will work with the State of Wisconsin and local officials.

3. Is Aquila developing three open-pit mines in Minnesota?

No. Aquila is not developing three open-pit mines in Minnesota.

If you have questions or concerns, please contact us at 906-753-9602, email us, or send us a message through our website.

 


OFFICIAL STATEMENT REGARDING WISCONSIN ASSEMBLY BILL 499

STEPHENSON, Mich. Dec. 18, 2017 – Aquila Resources today issued the following statement from Chantae Lessard, director social performance and engagement, in response to the recent passage of Wisconsin Assembly Bill 499.

“We applaud Governor Walker and GOP leaders for driving the change to ensure mining companies can invest in exploration activities in Wisconsin. The ‘Mining for America’ bill will benefit the region with jobs and economic investment. While we do have early-stage assets in Marathon and Taylor counties in Wisconsin, it’s far too early to know if these resources will develop into mines. We may conduct exploration activities at these sites in late 2018. Our focus remains on developing the Back Forty Mine in Michigan’s Upper Peninsula”.

If you have questions or concerns, please contact us at 906-753-9602, email us, or send us a message through our website.

 

Wisconsin capitol building
Wisconsin State Capitol @nealfagan

DOES CANADA STILL MINE ZINC AND GOLD?

STEPHENSON, Mich. Dec. 14, 2017 – Recently, we heard a claim that Canada has outlawed 'sulfide' mining. To make a long story short, this claim is false.

Our friends to the north did not outlaw the mining of sulfide-bearing ore bodies. In fact, we asked Justyna Laurie-Lean, Vice President Environment and Regulatory Affairs for the Mining Association of Canada (MAC), this very question. “Much of Canadian deposits and host rock have sulfides, so such a ban would be ludicrous,” Laurie-Jean replied in an email. In addition, MAC’s 2017 Guide to the Management of Tailings Facilities talks to the management of sulfide tailings.

Silvestri Matteo

There is no basis for describing a zinc, copper or any other mineral mine as a “sulfide mine.” The term “sulfide mining” is slang, not a scientific or industry term. It is a term used by mining opponents to elicit concern and to confuse people. They want people to think that a mining company is producing something other than the minerals needed by society, like zinc, copper, lead and other important raw materials. These metals occur naturally as sulfide-bearing mineral groups.

The London Metal Exchange (LME) is world's largest commodities exchange for metals. You will not find 'sulfides' on the list of metals being traded on the exchange. What you will find on the exchange are metals like those that we will mine at Back Forty: zinc, gold, copper, silver and lead.

So, what about the sulfides? The minerals that make up the sulfides are composed of metal cations (+2 charge) combined with sulfur(S). For example, chalcopyrite (CuFeS2) is the most abundant type of copper-bearing ore. Sulfide bearing tailings and waste rock will be stored on the Tailings and Waste Rock Management Facility (TWRMF) and Waste Rock Storage Facility. These facilities are designed to prevent metals from getting into the groundwater. They will feature multi-layered pads with a leak detection systems and sumps. All water on site, including from these sumps, is collected and either reused in the mining process or sent to the water treatment plant for processing prior to discharging to the river.

If you have questions or concerns, please contact us at 906-753-9602, email us, or send us a message through our website.

 

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